The Basics Of Aromatherapy – Part 1

Get a free psychic reading right now at PsychicAccess.comThe Mayo Clinic says the following about aromatherapy: “Research on the effectiveness of aromatherapy — the therapeutic use of essential oils extracted from plants — is limited. However, some studies have shown that aromatherapy might have health benefits, including:

– Relief from anxiety and depression

– Improved quality of life, particularly for people who have chronic health conditions.”

In my experience Aromatherapy can be used to enhance your life in several other ways. It can be useful in reducing bacteria, fungus, and mold; aiding relaxation to help relieve stress and tension and clear the mind; improving concentration, and mental clarity; stimulating neurotransmitters, endorphins and growth hormone production; and in helping to relieve headaches.

Absorbed through the skin and via the olfactory-brain connection through inhalation, they have been considered among the most therapeutic and rejuvenating of all botanical extracts throughout the ages ~ Valerie Gennari Cooksley

There are several ways to get the essential oils from plants and flowers. Distillation and expression create the purest form of oil, which are the essential oils I will be discussing in this series.

Other ways are infusion and extraction which create perfume oils, the ones you can buy in any store that also sells perfume candles. Most of us use these as room deodorizers.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

There are many different essential oils and they are not all created equally. Most are easy to use, some are toxic and should not be applied directly to the skin and will need to be mixed with another ingredient, and some are very toxic and should not be used on the skin at all. Before using any oil not covered in this series, please do your own research, or talk with someone with the necessary expertise who can advise you.

COMMON DIFFUSION METHODS

Apart from applying essential oils to the skin during various treatment or healing modalities, dispersing the essential oil into the air as a vapor is another popular method of using oils for aromatherapy purposes. Diffusion can be created using:

Light bulb rings. I recommend the ceramic ones, the metals in the brass rings aren’t good for our lungs, no matter how safe they seem to be, plus they’re harder to clean. The biggest advantage to using a ring is that the oils fill the room quickly. The biggest disadvantage is that it needs to be placed on a traditional rounded top bulb, and in my house I have energy efficient bulbs, which are twisted and makes it a poor fit.

Distillation is in itself a simple natural phenomenon. When you look above your head and see clouds in the sky, these are but evaporation’s visible shapes. And when you walk at dawn on grass dew, it is on night’s condensate ~ Georges Ferrando

Bath. A few drops of oil in a bathtub can clear your mind, soothe achy muscles or relax you after a stressful day, or even calm a fussy baby enough to sleep soundly. The caution I would use here is to be careful of how much oil you use, make sure it’s appropriate for the purpose and the age of the person using it.

Tea light diffuser. This consists of a two level container: the oil goes in the top level, and a tea light candle (the ones in the metal containers) is lit in the bottom level. I have a few of these spread all over the house. Some of them are only used to deodorize the house and some are used only with essential oils for a specific purpose: to clear energy, control illness symptoms, for meditation, and so forth.

Fountains. I used to own an indoor fountain and someone gave me a device that, when placed into the water, it creates a mist.  The oil could be added to the water and be “misted”, or diffused into the room.

Oil misting diffuser. This is a relatively new product and I haven’t tried one, but it works a lot like the fountain diffuser. I’ve been thinking about trying one, but I like the methods I use and my motto is “if it ain’t broke, it doesn’t need to be fixed.”

Spray. Oils mixed with water in a spray bottle opens up all kinds of alternative ways to deliver the oil. I use a combination of lavender, chamomile, and sandalwood mixed with water for the little ones. We call it “monster spray” and as far as the kids are concerned it chases away the monsters, but the adults know it’s just a spray to relax the kids.

Other ways to use aromatherapy oils is in shampoos, bath powders, lotions and soaps. The uses are endless.

EQUIPMENT YOU WILL NEED

I used to think I needed a lot of blenders and mixers in order to make useful concoctions. After I started working with scents, I discovered I actually needed very little. A good blender, a measuring cup and a set of measuring spoons is pretty much all you need. I also keep some decorative jars around in case I want to whip up a last minute gift.

Over the next few months I’ll be covering which oil to use for what purpose and teach you about mixing oils into carriers.

About The Author: Indigo is an Indigo child, her gifts have been handed down through generations, and she has used them since she was a teenager. Using a unique blend of, tarot, astrology, numerology, psychology and clairvoyance, she is able to give you the most information in the shortest time possible to help you find a way to change your situation. She has been a spiritual advisor in her community for 20 years and continues her education, while fostering the gifts she has handed down to her grand-children. You can get a reading from Indigo at PsychicAccess.com.

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